Joomla Development Blog

One of our partners approached us recently about re-creating a client's site in Joomla. The original site was working fine, but they wanted to make it responsive. The problem was that the marketing agency who originally created the site wanted an arm and leg to make it responsive. On top of this, they were busy for several months and it could be a year before the work was completed. Unfortunately, there wasn't a lot the client could do. They had already paid an arm and leg to have the site developed and the platform that it was developed on was proprietary to the marketing agency. This is a form of vendor lock-in. In this post, we'll discuss why lock-in is terrible for your business and 3 common techniques that I've seen used to create it in web development.

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We just launched a portfolio plugin for WordPress at the beginning of September. Every project has its gotcha moment right at the end when you think you're done and an undiscovered assumption rears its ugly head. The plugin, Pizzazz Portfolio, was no different. The business model for Pizzazz is freemium where a free version is available to everyone and a commercial version with more features is available to those who want more beef. Our stumbling block was when we realized that we couldn't perform a direct upgrade from free to premium using WordPress. We've built several WordPress plugins, however the portfolio plugin is the first time we've released a plugin into the WordPress plugin directory for mass distribution. I asked some peers of mine how they handled these types of upgrades and they told me that they typically wrote custom updater classes. We could have done this, but there was just one problem: like any good developer, I'm lazy. I don't want to write custom updater classes if I don't have to. I won't explain here why it is good for developers (and benefits their clients) to be lazy, but I will blow your hair back by explaining how we used Joomla to upgrade WordPress.

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I receive a work inquiry in the form of an RFP every couple of months.  If you're unfamiliar with the abbreviation, an RFP is a request for proposal.  It's a document that a client will prepare and post publicly or send out to potential vendors with the aim of gathering proposals to accomplish a project.  In certain industries, and at certain business sizes, this approach is common.  For example, government projects will often be initiated with an RFP.  Without fail, the RFP's that are sent our way go directly to my garbage folder.  Its not that I'm ungrateful for the opportunity, just that I recognize a waste of time when I see it.  And, though it does have some merit, I don't think it's a great way for a client to get their project completed either.  In this post will take a look at the problems with RFP's and suggest an alternative.

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